Tolkien Trail

Member's reports from Tolkien related events.
Iolanthe
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Tolkien Trail

Postby Iolanthe » Mon Apr 09, 2007 11:19 am

Tolkien Trail


Image
Tolkien by his favourite Tree



There are many places that have been associated with Tolkien throughout his long life: Oxford, Leeds, Birmingham, Bournmouth and visits to Ireland and elsewhere.

What are the places Tolkien lived and worked in like? This thread is for any of us lucky enough to take the Tolkien Trail and share our adventures, thoughts and impressions.
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Now let the song begin! Let us sing together
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Iolanthe
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Postby Iolanthe » Mon Apr 09, 2007 11:51 am

Iolanthe, Mabreterese and Jonick’s Excellent Adventure

or

The Quest to Find Tolkien’s Oxford

Being the
Gest


of
Iolanthe the Muddled

and
Mabreterese the Brave

and
Jonick the Extremely Patient
and their trusty steed, Corsa the blue


Three friends there were of days of old:
when bright sun shone with gleaming gold
And hearts were high and feet were ready
and trusty Corsa, true and steady
did rev his engine at jonick’s tread,
with maps in hand and plans all read
did sally forth with eager faces….


Ok…. this is way too difficult....


Saturday 7th May 2007


One day soon after the Tolkien Conference, mabreterese and I had the mad idea of seeing everything in Oxford associated with Tolkien in one day. After a lengthy hatching we settled on Easter as a great time to go for it. So armed with a spiffing Plan ‘A’ devised by mabreterese, lots of useful bits of paper, an inaccurate map of Tolkien’s Oxford haunts that I downloaded from a website, a complete ignorance about Tolkien’s favourite tree (see Botanic Gardens and the Great Tree Quest below) and with jonick our new MeJ member as our trusty driver, we headed off for Oxford on Saturday morning. It was a gloriously balmy spring day, perfect weather for tramping the Tolkien Trail with cameras and maps. After a long drive talking about the books and admiring ‘fluffy’ trees (mabreterese’s great word for trees that are mainly naked but have a bit of budding going on) we arrived at the first stop of Plan A, Wolvercote Cemetery.


Wolvercote Cemetery or ‘The Eagles are Coming’


Image
Tolkien and Edith’s grave

© Iolanthe


Much to our relief Tolkien and Edith’s grave was signposted as I couldn’t remember exactly where it was from my last visit. Jonick loped off ahead and managed to pass it several times but I could spot it from afar it with it’s impressive rosemary bush now in full flower. Someone had left a fresh bunch of flowers in a jar and a spray of pink carnations lay beside them. Bees buzzed happily over the rosemary. The weatherworn toy lamb and battered felt eagle were still resting on the shrub by the headstone (remember them, Merry?), there were new rings hanging on the rose trees and, right on the edge of the grave, someone had left a nice shiny pair of sunglasses. If I remember rightly there are no sunglasses in LotR (not even in the glare of Mount Doom).

To properly mark the occasion I whipped out my copy of poems from LotR and read the Eagles Song from the end of The Return of the King. I thought the words would be very fitting so close to Easter and the return of the true King.

It was very beautiful and peaceful and we spent quite a time there before heading back to the car and one of Oxford’s many park-and-ride carparks.


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Tolkien and Edith’s grave showing the rosemary and heather in full bloom

© Iolanthe


20 and 22 Northmoor Road or Huan the Hound


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20 Northmoor (R) and 22 Northmoor (L)

© Iolanthe


After depositing our car at the park-and-ride we took the bus into the centre of Oxford, hopping off half way to find Northmoor Road. 22 Northmoor Road is where the Tolkiens lived from 1925 to 1930 before moving next door to the roomier number 20, where they lived until 1947.

Now, there is something very shady about lurking around suburban streets staring at people’s houses. We tried to perfect a kind of nonchalance, approaching from the opposite side of the road with the air of casual passers by who just happen to have cameras and a habit of lingering, but it’s jolly difficult to carry off. Number 20 has a Blue Plaque proclaiming the Tolkien residency whereas number 22 has a loud dog trained to smell the over-excited scent of Lord of the Rings fans and bark madly at them. Number 22 is the prettier house, a bit lower and snugger with a well grown garden of bushes and tall trees protecting it. Number 20 doesn’t seem to mind you looking at it so much and anyway, its fence has fallen down.


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Number 20 Northmoor Road

© Iolanthe


Here is my photo of the blue plaque at number 20. You can’t read the dates because I was lurking nonchalantly behind a tree.


Image

© Iolanthe


But mabreterese has a photo of the gate and actual number of number 22 which she bravely stood and took while I nonchalantly retreated up the road.


The Eagle and Child or Ecstasy in the Rabbit Room


Image

© Iolanthe


The next part of Plan A was to hop on a bus into the centre of Oxford and have lunch at the Eagle and Child, where Tolkien, C.S. Lewis and the other Inklings often had their beer and smoked their pipes beside a cosy fire. The Eagle and Child is pretty much opposite jonick’s old college, St. Johns, and he admitted that in all his undergraduate years he had never drunk there. This almost disqualified him from the Tolkien Quest completely but we took pity on him and allowed him to order our lunch.

Imagine our delight when some people left as soon as we came in without even finishing their drinks and we found a free table in the Rabbit Room where The Inklings ACTUALLY SAT. No more sitting around the corner and basking in its reflected light, like at the Tolkien Conference, or annoying other drinkers by leaning over them to look at the photos, like the guided tour. We were there. The nook was ours. Or half ours as others had the table nearest the fire. Imagine our delight when they too left (perhaps the heat of our joy was too much for them) and we moved to THE corner by the fire and sat under Tolkien’s photo and the plaque declaring that the Inklings had been there. Now we were sitting where the Inklings had sat. We glowed through the whole lunch. We thought what a shame it was we didn’t have Merry’s number so we could ring her and yell ‘Guess where we are!!!!’. We lingered over our pie, egg and chips and veggie sausages with mash reluctant to leave. We got menus to take home with us from a kindly bar staff who understood that it’s best to humour nutters.


Image
Inklings corner in the Rabbit Room, Eagle and Child.

© Iolanthe



Eventually we managed to prise ourselves out of the nook and into…

St. Aloysius

St. Aloysius is just up the road from the Eagle and Child and was Tolkien’s main place of worship for much of his time in Oxford. Mabreterese has a photo of the sober exterior, I hope, as I forgot to take one. Very impressive and highly decorated inside it has a kind of quiet gravitas. Quiet preparations were being made for Easter Sunday while we trudged nonchalantly up and down trying not to look like over-excited Tolkien fans who had just arrived from the Eagle and Child.


Exeter College and My Room

Our next stop was going to be Exeter College where Tolkien was an undergraduate and, hugely more important, where Merry and I stayed for the Oxford Tolkien Conference.

But….. Exeter College was closed and I couldn’t show mabreterese and jonick the wonderful Chapel with the William Morris tapestries, Tolkien’s bust, the lovely Quadrangle and, hugely more importantly, the window of my room. We contented ourselves with standing outside in Turl street where I pointed out that one of the windows above us was the window of (rather less importantly) Tolkien’s room. It was one of the ones near the bay window, either above it, or to the left of it, or the right of it. Or maybe it was it. Anyway, here is a nice photo of a bicycle:


Image

© Iolanthe


This isn’t Tolkien’s bicycle but I bet he had one very like it.


99 Holywell Street or The Red Door

The next stop of Plan A (now Plan B) was 99 Holywell Street which was the second Merton owned house the Tolkien’s lived in from 1950 to 1953 after downsizing from Northmoor Road. I was very confident that we would find it as I knew it had a red door (see the Tolkien Conference photos). As we walked further and further down the road I felt a faint panic set in as there wasn’t a single red door in sight. This is because the current owners, with absolutely no thought at all whatsoever for any poor Tolkien fan that might have remembered a red door, have painted it blue. Here is 99 Holywell with its nice new blue door:


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99 Holywell with its new blue door.

© Iolanthe



So if you ever visit Holywell Street you are now looking for a blue door, or you could spoil all the fun and look at the actual house numbers.


3 Manor Road or the Wrong House


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The Wrong House

© Iolanthe



After sussing out the new paintwork at Holywell we headed off to nearby Manor Road (still Plan B). Thanks to Wolvercote we were now very into cemeteries and passed a very beautiful one on the right which we all agreed was a very fine cemetery as cemeteries go having lots of primroses and a bit of a hillside view (a perk for non residents). 3 Manor Road is the first Merton owned house which Tolkien and Edith lived in from 1947-1950 and where Tolkien typed up LotR. Unfortunately we stood long and reverentially in front of number 5 Manor Road. This was absolutely nothing to do with the owners painting the door the wrong colour. On the bus going back to the park-and-ride mabreterese consulted her notes (sensibly taken from the Letters) and said ‘Hey, I’ve got down here that Tolkien lived at 3 Manor Road’. But my stupid ‘Tolkien’s Oxford’ map clearly has 5 Manor Road printed on it. Heigh ho. So the photo above is of numbers 5 and 4 Manor Road and number 3 (which is identical) is somewhere off the picture to the right. Well, all I can say is that if Tolkien didn’t live at number 5 he jolly well should have done.


The Botanic Gardensor The Great Tree Quest

After 3, 4 and 5 Manor Road we headed for the Botanic Gardens to try and find Tolkien’s favourite tree. This was my mad idea and, rather uselessly, I hadn’t much idea what tree it was, but I was pretty sure it would be big. Somewhere in the recesses of my brain I could see the words ‘Pinus Nigra’ (Black Pine) and a photo of it beside a wall. The Botanic Gardens are walled all round and every tree looks as though it’s beside one depending on the angle from which you approach it.

There is a small fee for entering the Botanic Gardens and they give you a leaflet with features horticultural highlights. The Pinus Nigra (planted 1800) is one of them but there was no mention of Tolkien. I think they have this weird idea that people visiting a Botanic Garden are actually there to look at the plants. Anyway, we found the Pinus Nigra rather quickly – there is no denying it’s a very impressive tree with an enormous twisted, curvy trunk, wonderful bark and a definite looming presence. But was it Tolkien’s Tree?


Image
The Pinus Nigra

© Iolanthe


We decided to have our photos taken next to it anyway. I came up with the brilliant idea that we should have our photos taken in front of every tree in the Botanic Gardens, thereby ensuring that no matter which tree Tolkien liked most, we’d hit a bull’s-eye, but this received rather luke-warm support. Jonick was asked by two passers by if he would take a photo of them by the tree. I nodded at them and said, hopefully, ‘because it’s Tolkien’s tree?’ but they looked completely blank. I think they were just doing it because we’d done it. We wandered about a bit considering other trees – I think the Botanic Gardens must be wonderful when all the plants are in flower but they are a bit bare in April – and couldn’t resist two ancient and gnarled trees either side of the Pinus Nigra which looked like venerable Ents:

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Ent

© Iolanthe


The trunk of the one above is almost horizontal and I hope you can see an Ent with an enormous outstretched arm. You have to believe that Tolkien enjoyed these ancient stumps as much as the Pinus Nigra.

Doing a bit of research afterwards I discovered that we did have the right tree (phew) and here is Tolkien standing by it in the last photo ever taken of him:


Image
Tolkien by the Pinus Nigra



We could have stayed longer in the gardens, admired the rockery and sat for a bit but we wanted to see Merton College which was supposedly closing at 4pm.


21 Merton Street or My Feet Ache

Image
21 Merton Street

© Iolanthe


After Edith died, Tolkien moved from Bournemouth back to Oxford and was offered Merton accommodation here at 21 Merton St. There isn’t much to say about 21 Merton Street except that we were pretty tired at this point and driven by the need to get to Merton College before it shut. Either that or collapse with a cream tea.


Merton College or Serious Temptation in Blackwells

Well….. Merton College was shut. So we went for a cream tea.

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Merton with notices saying it’s shut

© Iolanthe


After tea we took ourselves off to Blackwell’s book shop (Plan C), where, after a bit of wandering and sending jonick off to the History section, mabreterese and I plucked up the courage to ask where the Tolkien books were, thereby declaring ourselves openly to be Middle-earth geeks. It’s such a relief when you finally come out. Mabreterese found the pull of nicely bound Tolkienalia too irresistible to ignore (lucky she wasn’t carrying the One Ring to Mordor) but I was strong and didn’t buy anything. Ok…ok...well, I admit it, I bought a whole suitcase of books at the Tolkien Conference and I still haven’t read most of them…..


76 Sandfield Road or The End of our Fellowship

Well the time had come to leave Oxford. But we’ll go back. We have to storm Merton and Exeter (if only I’d kept my gate swipe card…), visit the Bodleian Gift Shop (also shut), look reverentially at 3 Manor Road instead of 5 Manor Road and visit the neglected 50 John Street (because I now know what Tolkien did there). But before leaving completely, we had one last visit to make. On the road out we made a detour to Sandfield Road in Headington where the Tolkiens lived for 15 years, from 1953 until 1968.


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76 Sandfield Road

© Iolanthe


This was our one final chance to nonchalantly amble past some poor unsuspecting person’s private home in a convincing manner and by now we were old hands at it. We had ‘come out’ as Middle-earthers and everything was possible. We gazed respectfully from across the road. We noted the rather fine stone plaque above the front door that said he’d lived there. We stared in astonishment at the two chubby and weathered garden gnomes that were minding their own business in the front garden. And then we headed for home.

Tolkien may no longer be at Sandfield Road, but the gnomes live on….


Image

© Iolanthe


….. and we all know what Tolkien would have made of them.
Last edited by Iolanthe on Tue Apr 10, 2007 10:13 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Now let the song begin! Let us sing together
Of sun, stars, moon and mist, rain and cloudy weather...

Merry
Varda
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Postby Merry » Mon Apr 09, 2007 10:33 pm

Iolanthe and Companions, this is so wonderful! I am jealous to my bones! Wonderful pictures and very funny reporting--it brought back so many good memories. I wonder if any of the plants that JRRT planted at his several houses are still alive? Too bad you couldn't get into Exeter.

I love seeing the rosemary in bloom.
0 x
Sing and be glad, all ye children of the West,
for your King shall come again,
and he shall dwell among you
all the days of your life.

Iolanthe
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Postby Iolanthe » Tue Apr 10, 2007 10:12 am

It looked beautiful, Merry! And it was very calm, peaceful and sunny there with hardly anyone else around.

I think some of the plants in the gardens must be still around from Tolkien's time. The front garden of 22 Northmoor was full of tall, mature shrubs and trees that looked long established and the trees in front of 20 Northmoor must have been there as long and included a large holly.

It was a great shame Exeter and Merton were shut. We never got to Pembroke but there is every chance that was shut too. I was desperate to see Exeter again and relive happy memories but we came to the conclusion that a lot of the colleges were shut because of the Easter break. According to their websites they should have been open and I had all the times written down on a scrap of paper :( .

And the Bodleian was wrapped in scaffolding and plastic and also shut :( . We wanted to visit the wonderful giftshop and I wanted some Tolkien cards. Oh well. We are not that far away and it's a good excuse to go again!!!

I also wanted to try and find the two trees that the Tolkien Society planted in the park in Tolkien's memory, but it would have been too much of a hike and they wouldn't have been in leaf. One is silver and one is gold :D .
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Now let the song begin! Let us sing together
Of sun, stars, moon and mist, rain and cloudy weather...

marbretherese
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Postby marbretherese » Tue Apr 10, 2007 11:32 am

Initially I was disappointed that Exeter and the Bodleian were closed - but we would never have had the time to take them in properly AND see all the other things as well, so it's a great excuse to go back!

I'll post the photos Iolanthe mentioned - plus a couple of others - in a day or so, along with my thoughts on our day out . . .
0 x
"Torment in the dark was the danger that I feared, and it did not hold me back.
But I would not have come, had I known the danger of light and joy."


http://www.marbretherese.com
http://marbretherese.blogspot.com/

jonick
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Postby jonick » Tue Apr 10, 2007 12:52 pm

I thought the trip itself had been entertaining enough until I read Iolanthe's report ! Hilarious ! A wonderful day out - here's to Part 2 !
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Lindariel
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Postby Lindariel » Tue Apr 10, 2007 2:57 pm

This is just WONDERFUL! Sounds like you had a splendid day enjoying each other's company and taking in the sights. Iolanthe, your report is just hilarious; I thoroughly snarfed on my tea when I got to "here is a nice photo of a bicycle"! I look forward to Marbretherese's take on the day and her photos.

Wish I could have been there too . . . . (Sigh)
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“Therefore I say: Eä! Let these things Be! And I will send forth into the Void the Flame Imperishable, and it shall be at the heart of the World, and the World shall Be.”

Merry
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Postby Merry » Tue Apr 10, 2007 3:10 pm

It WAS a nice photo of a bicycle, wasn't it?

For those who are interested, one can order stuff from the Bodleian gift shop on-line: a nice selection of Tolkien things that I haven't seen anywhere else.

You know, I don't think that the present owners of all of Tolkien's former houses are fooled by all that nonchalance! I bet they're pretty used to pilgrims by now.

I look forward to your report, marbretherese!
0 x
Sing and be glad, all ye children of the West,
for your King shall come again,
and he shall dwell among you
all the days of your life.

Iolanthe
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Location: Washing my hair in the Sundering Sea

Postby Iolanthe » Tue Apr 10, 2007 5:28 pm

We certainly had a great time, I really wish you could have all come along with us! The highlight was definitely getting the prime seat in the Eagle and Child. I thought it would be heaving but it wasn't really that busy. The food was wonderful - I had a panacotta with forest fruits to die for and mabreterese's rhubarb crumble looked wonderful too. Jonick had the world's largest piece of chocolate fudge cake and ate it so fast we barely had time to admire it :lol: . If any of you ever get over to Oxford I recommend eating there!!!

I think you're right about the house owners Merry, I don't think they are fooled for a minute :lol: . At least the road wasn't filled with fellow lurkers, only us.
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Now let the song begin! Let us sing together
Of sun, stars, moon and mist, rain and cloudy weather...

marbretherese
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Postby marbretherese » Wed Apr 11, 2007 8:22 pm

At last I've had a chance to get my thoughts - and photos - in order and can give you my take on our Big Day Out!

As Iolanthe has already explained, we had a glorious day for our trip to Oxford. We started at the end, as it were, with the visit to Wolvercote cemetery and I admit I didn’t quite manage not to cry as Iolanthe read out the poem. Tolkien’s grave was (discreetly) well signposted – enabling fans to find it without disturbing other visitors. I managed to take a few photos without stepping on anybody – always a worry in a graveyard – and thought how appropriate the setting was, with so many trees around. I hadn’t expected the rosemary – it was gorgeous! and the whole place had an aura of tranquillity.

Northmoor Road was also really quiet for the middle of a Saturday morning and as a result I felt really conspicuous, especially when we whipped our cameras out in the vicinity of numbers 20 and 22. I’m glad Iolanthe got a shot of the blue plaque, because mine is totally illegible – my hands were shaking with excitement! I did snatch this shot of number 22, beating a hasty retreat as the barking started . . . :oops:

Image

© marbretherese

Paparazzi pic of 22 Northmoor Road


Flushed with success we made our way to the Eagle & Child. As you can see from this photo, the general surroundings can’t have changed much from Tolkien’s day:

Image

© marbretherese

The Eagle & Child with a view along St Giles


I LOVED the Eagle & Child. In fact I tried to persuade Jonick and Iolanthe to leave me there while they continued the rest of the tour, but they wouldn’t :( . I can’t find the official origin of the name Rabbit Room – but ‘rabbit’ is Cockney rhyming slang for ‘talk’ (rabbit & pork) and I do hope that’s why the room is so called . . . I was in Tolkien heaven throughout our lunch, which was excellent, by the way. I’m sure he would have liked the fact that one of the commemorative plaques was put up by the Campaign for Real Ale! When I asked if we could take a menu as a souvenir the staff said we could have a couple of their old menus in return for a small donation to charity, which I thought was a great idea. The menu has the history of the pub on the back.

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© marbretherese

History of the Eagle & Child


Here’s my pic of the façade of the Oratory Catholic Church of St Aloysius (or as much of it as I could cram into one shot):

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© marbretherese

The façade of St Aloysius


It’s beautiful inside and we nearly lost Jonick completely at this point (somewhere else he’d never visited although his old college, St John’s, is opposite . . . :roll: ) as he wandered up and down contemplating the stations of the cross. A quick hallo to St John’s itself and then we were into the centre!

Despite Exeter and Merton colleges being shut I was still merrily snapping away. Turl Street has barely changed since Tolkien’s time and I tried to recreate his sketch of the view from his room – hampered somewhat by the fact that (a) I was using a camera (b) we couldn’t work out exactly where his room was and (c) I was at ground level. But you get the general idea . . .

Image

© marbretherese

Turl Street, Oxford, 2007


Having viewed Tolkien houses in Holywell Street and Manor Road (well almost – number 3 is identical to number 5 so you have a sense of how cramped he must have found it after Northmoor Road), we lingered by the river before heading into the Botanical Gardens, Iolanthe cheerfully asserting that she knew exactly where Tolkien’s favourite tree was. Probably that one. Or maybe the one over there . . eventually Jonick took our photo by the Pinus Negra, with Iolanthe standing, as it turned out, in the exact spot that Tolkien did for his photo!!! We picked up pine cones as souvenirs. There were various trees around that could have been models for ents:

Image

© marbretherese

Entish tree in the Botanical Gardens


Iolanthe was remarking on this as a group of visitors passed us, and one elderly lady turned and agreed with her :D so we weren’t the only Tolkien fans around. I took the opportunity to take an ‘Oxford in springtime shot’ which I like to think is rather Elven:

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© marbretherese

Springtime in the Botanical Gardens


We tramped the streets a bit longer and I couldn’t resist taking this photo:

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© marbretherese

Logic Lane, Oxford


and although Iolanthe’s already shown you 21 Merton Street, I’m going to as well, because I like the photo (yes, it has a bicycle in it) and the house. I thought it was an ideal place for Tolkien to spend his final years after Edith died; he would have been right in the centre of things rather than deep in the suburbs, which might have been rather lonely for a widower.

Image

© marbretherese

21 Merton Street


It’s true, we did spend ages in Blackwell’s. As well as the Tolkien books I bought a dictionary (what better place to buy a dictionary than Oxford?), choosing the Concise version of the OED. What was the difference between the Concise and the Compact, Iolanthe wondered? Answer: about ten pounds Sterling, and I was treating myself!! Then we had to retrieve Jonick from the Military History section (not an easy task :roll: ) so he could carry it back to the bus-stop for me :) .

Of all the Tolkien houses, I liked our last stop, Sandfield Road, the best, probably because it reminded me of the suburban houses in the area where I grew up. I like the fact that the plaque on it is in keeping with the house rather than a blue one. I didn’t even mind the gnomes . . . .

. . . . I can’t wait to go back!
0 x
"Torment in the dark was the danger that I feared, and it did not hold me back.
But I would not have come, had I known the danger of light and joy."


http://www.marbretherese.com
http://marbretherese.blogspot.com/

jonick
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Postby jonick » Wed Apr 11, 2007 9:57 pm

Lovely ! An excellent complement to Iolanthe's report ! I'm not going to add my tuppennyworth as you two gracious ladies have said it all (and I hardly took any photos !) It WAS a great day out. :D
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Lindariel
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Postby Lindariel » Wed Apr 11, 2007 10:18 pm

Thanks so much for your account and your photos, Marbretherese. What a great trip!
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“Therefore I say: Eä! Let these things Be! And I will send forth into the Void the Flame Imperishable, and it shall be at the heart of the World, and the World shall Be.”

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Postby Merry » Thu Apr 12, 2007 4:05 am

This has been so fun! Thanks for your report and photos, marbretherese! (I am SO jealous!) I had forgotten about Logic Lane. One of my former logic students spent his junior year at Oxford and loved it. He sent me a picture of Logic Lane. You've got to think that there is some bit of academic lore behind that.

Your photo of Turl Street does look like it could have been taken a hundred years ago.

There is a lot to look at in St. Aloysius. The sanctuary reredos (I hope I'm using the right term) is populated by dozens and dozens of small statues of saints. I would have enjoyed looking a lot closer, but when we were there, there were several people stopping by to say a short prayer, and I didn't want my gawking to distract them. In addition to being Tolkien's parish, St. Aloysius was the place where my favorite poet, Gerard Manley Hopkins, was a curate.
0 x
Sing and be glad, all ye children of the West,
for your King shall come again,
and he shall dwell among you
all the days of your life.

marbretherese
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 1:42 pm
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Postby marbretherese » Thu Apr 12, 2007 8:42 am

Merry wrote: In addition to being Tolkien's parish, St. Aloysius was the place where my favorite poet, Gerard Manley Hopkins, was a curate.


Merry, thanks so much for that piece of information! I studied Gerard Manley Hopkins at school, but hadn't realised the link with St Aloysius. I've often thought I should go back to his poems, as I didn't fully appreciate them when I was younger . . . another book for the wish list!

Glad you all enjoyed the report. I had a lot of fun writing about our day out!
0 x
"Torment in the dark was the danger that I feared, and it did not hold me back.
But I would not have come, had I known the danger of light and joy."


http://www.marbretherese.com
http://marbretherese.blogspot.com/

Iolanthe
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Postby Iolanthe » Thu Apr 12, 2007 9:21 am

Thanks for filling in all the rest of our day, mabreterese :D . What a good idea to scan the Eagle and Child info on the back of the menu!

I love what you've done to the photo of Turl Street, it does look like something from a bygone age. And the view down the street by the Eagle and Child gives it a nice bit of context.

I was hoping you'd post a photo of the second 'ent' :D . And the 'paparazzi' no. 22 shot :lol: .

I'd forgotten the Gerard Manly Hopkins connection with St. Aloysius :oops: . If only I'd remembered while we were there (or read the entry in that little book I was carrying around...). I never noticed the tiny saints on the screen, Merry. I guess I was transfixed again by the carved 'floating heads' that seen to peer through windows above the altar. I still think they are a bit 'creepy'.

When we go again we'll also have to go to Blackfriars and see if they'll let us look at the Stations of the Cross with the remarkable 'Orc' soldiers and the statue of St. Dominic with the 'Eärendillian' star on his brow.

Also planned sometime in the future.....a trip to Sarehole Mill :D ! It seems silly not to take a look as we are within an easy drive and we're very curious to see what it's like now it's been 'eaten' by a large connurbation.
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Now let the song begin! Let us sing together
Of sun, stars, moon and mist, rain and cloudy weather...


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